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Jakub Narebski

  • About: I read Perl blogs.
  • Commented on Perl::Critic Has New Home And New Look
    The new perlcritic.com interface lost the very useful option of submitting code or code fragment by pasting it in the textarea, instead of uploading a file....
  • Commented on Things we don't have #1
    That's perhaps why byobu (an enhancement for the terminal multiplexers) is written in Python....
  • Commented on Write GUI faster -> GCL
    What about using QML (from Perl)?...
  • Commented on Compare Git repository viewer, "GitPrep" and "GitLab"
    Is GitPrep more of a web repository browsing tool like e.g. gitweb (CGI.pm Perl), cgit (in C) or Gitalist (Catalyst), or repository management / git-based software forge like Gitorious (Ruby), GitHub:FI (Ruby, proprietary) or InDefero (PHP)?...
  • Commented on Visualizing Dependencies On Stratopan
    I wonder if having arrows in appropriate direction when all links are either dependencies or requirements would make it easier to visualize......
  • Commented on On the removal of some core modules
    There is always local::lib for local install...
  • Commented on Count-up to 100 CPAN Distributions: Test-XML-Ordered, SDLx-Betweener, and more
    Why generate a tool to write/generate recursive descent parsers instead of using Marpa and its ecosystem?...
  • Commented on Sparklines in Excel::Writer::XLSX
    Didn't Micro$oft patented sparklines (thanks to broken patent system)?...
  • Commented on A Marpa paper
    Slightly off-topic: I have just read in article about LibreOffice 3.5 that it includes "Lightproof, a language-neutral grammatical analysis tool that is implemented in Python and has a sophisticated regex-based rule system.". I wonder if proper parser would be not...
  • Commented on On defined(@array) and defined(%hash)
    There is always autovivify pragma (usually used as no autovivify 'something') to avoid autovivification......
  • Commented on QR Code FAQ
    Hmmm... would such zigzag be enough taking into account error correction features of QR codes?...
  • Commented on Marpa and OO
    I wonder how in current Marpa::XS, and future Marpa::OO would "code reuse" look like. There are cases where you want to use the same grammar to drive different output, e.g. parse C declaration and: create equivalent of h2xs - convert...
  • Commented on Developing parsers incrementally with Marpa
    I have read it somewhere that C++ has undecidable grammar. Does it mean that it cannot be parsed using Marpa?...
  • Commented on What! No Lexer?
    @Jeffrey: Thanks for response. What would be nice to have is to have among Marpa documentation full example of generating lexer and parses, for example out of description in some Internet RFC (email address perhaps?). BTW. I wonder how hard...
  • Commented on A new web site for Marpa
    By the way, shouldn't Marpa::XS POD include link to said official web site for Marpa? If it is there, and I have just not found it, sorry for confusion....
  • Commented on What! No Lexer?
    Well, I don't know if there is language like BNF / ABNF for describing tokens, or whether BNF can be used for that, but automatic generation of lexer from rules is what I meant when asking about lexer....
  • Commented on A new web site for Marpa
    Very nice! Now only to have something similar for creating tokenizers (lex) like Marpa is for creating parsers (yacc)......
  • Commented on Perl Calltrace
    Or Dir::Self...
  • Commented on How to parse HTML, part 2
    Would parsing C (or at least C declarations), for example to generate bindings to other language, be a good application of Marpa?...
  • Commented on Dist::Zilla, Pod::Weaver and bin
    I wonder if having separate script.sh.pod file with POD would work......
  • Commented on What is the Marpa algorithm?
    Perhaps you could publish your "Ruby Slippers" algorithm too?...
  • Commented on Marpa v. Perl regexes: some numbers
    @Jeffrey Kegler: Could you include loglog plot of results, i.e. logarithmic x axis with size, logarithmic y axis with time (perhaps with more data points than in table). From the slope of lines one can easily read if for given...
  • Commented on How do you select the best installed version?
    inc::latest...
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  • Steven Haryanto commented on Things we don't have #1

    @Nate: yup, there are actually several syntax highlighting libraries on CPAN, but they all suck (sometimes infinitely more so), at least compared to pygments/coderay.

  • Steven Haryanto commented on Things we don't have #1

    @anonymous: Last time I checked, SHE::Kate is very slow. Thanks for mentioning Tickit, I saw this before some time ago, but couldn't recall the name or the author. Now bookmarked, and will be checking it out.

  • Buddy Burden commented on Things we don't have #1

    I've always used screen instead of tmux. I guess I just haven't seen any feature of tmux that would make it worth switching to after all these years.

    AFA using a whole bunch of terminal windows ... well, even apart from the insane value of keeping all those windows, including their running processes and scrollback buffers, around forever, barring only a reboot, it's a quantity issue for me. I'm currently running over 20 different windows in screen, and I usually have over 30. Having that many terminal windows lying around would make me insane. Even having a single term with that …

  • Steven Haryanto commented on Things we don't have #1

    Somebody reminded me about Inline::Python (and similar Inline::* modules), so to some extent we can "have" those things that we don't have :) Will be trying out I::Py on some Python extensions. Thanks.

  • prakash commented on Things we don't have #1

    From what I see, byobu seems to be a wrapper for GNU screen (and, in recent versions, tmux too). It is not a replacement for either (in fact the ubuntu byobu package depends on either one of them.)

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