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Mark Allen

  • Website: www.byte-me.org
  • About: Singer, dad, nerd, not necessarily in that order. @bytemeorg
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  • Steven Haryanto commented on GitHub is an amazing service that much of the Perl community has...

    @perldreamer: Well said.

    Besides, for public git repos it shouldn't matter which one you choose. They're sort of like offsite-backups. I've so far used github, bitbucket, gitorious, repo.or.cz, and it's just a matter of adding a couple of lines in your .git/config. But so far I'm most pleased with github (the attention to details in UI, the availability, the features). So go github!

  • Joel Berger commented on Introducing Net::EC2::Tiny

    Actually I think its a fine precedent to set/follow that ::Tiny modules (especially those ones for not so tiny tasks) pull in Moo.

    ::Tiny doesn't have a strict definition. Sometimes it mean literally "few lines of code" and sometimes it means "just the foundational bits you need to do some task". For those latter cases, yours included, Moo is probably fine. IMO

  • Aristotle commented on Introducing Net::EC2::Tiny
  • Tatsuhiko Miyagawa commented on Why I use cpanfile (and you should too)

    Mark:
    I see, then you can do:

    cpanm git://github.com/mrallen1/perl-Tombala

    :)

  • jakoblog.de commented on Why I use cpanfile (and you should too)

    I stopped editing Makefile.PL or Build.PL for both, CPAN modules and applications. With Dist::Zilla one can either track dependencies in dist.ini (also automatically with [AutoPrereqs]) or in cpanfile and use [FromCPANfile].

    A benefit of this approach is a better separation between data ("what") and code ("how"): Makefile.PL and Build.PL is code how to do the build process. cpanfile is data to specify what dependencies exist.

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