Into The Labyrinth

On the 1st January 2011, I released the first Open Source version of Labyrinth, both to CPAN and GitHub. In additon I also released several plugins and a demo site to highlight some of the basic functionality of the system.

Labyrinth has been in the making since December 2002, although the true beginnings are from about mid-2001. The codebase has evolved over the years as I've developed more and more websites, and got a better understanding exactly what I would want from a Website Management System. Labyrinth had the intention of being a website in a box, and although it's not quite there yet, hopefully once I've released all the plugin code I can put a proper installation tool in place.

Labyrinth now is the backend to several Open Source websites, CPAN Testers using it for the Reports, Blog, Wiki and Preferences sites, as well as some personal, commercial and community projects. As a consequence Labyrinth has become stable enough to look at growing the plugins, rather than the core code. I'm sure there is plenty that could be done with the core code, but for the moment providing a good set of plugins, and some example sites are my next aims.

As mentioned, I see Labyrinth as a Website Management System. While many similar applications and frameworks provide the scaffolding for a Content Management System, Labyrinth extends that by not only providing the ability to manage your content, but also to provide a degree of structure around the functionality of the site, so the management of users and groups, menu options and access, as well as notification mechanisms, enable you to provide more control dynamically.

When writing the fore-runner to Labyrinth, one aspect required was the ability to turn on and off functionality instantly, which meant much of the logic flow was described in the data, not the code. Labyrinth has built on this idea, so that the dispatch tables and general functionality can be controlled by the user via administration screens, and not by uploading new code. When I started looking at this sort of application back in 2001, there was nothing available that could do that. Today there are several frameworks written in Perl that potentially could be tailored to process a website in this way, but all require the developer to design and code the functionality. Labyrinth aims to provide that pre-packaged.

I'm primarily releasing Labyrinth so that I can release all the code that drives the CPAN Testers websites. Giving others the ability to better suggest improvements and contribute. The system allows me the freedom to build websites quickly and easily, with the hardwork being put into the design and CSS layouts. With so many other frameworks available, all of which have bigger development teams and support mechanisms than I can offer, I'm not intending Labyrinth to be a competitor. It might interest some, which is great, but if you prefer to work on other frameworks that's great too. After all it's still Perl ;)

More news of plugins and sites being released coming soon.

Leave a comment

About Barbie

user-pic Leader of and a CPAN author. Co-organised YAPC::Europe in 2006. Responsible for the YAPC Conference Surveys, helping to improve YAPCs every year. Also the current caretaker for the CPAN Testers websites and data stores. If you really want to find out more, buy me a Guinness. Just don't ask the obvious ... Grep has been for 10 years and is still no closer ;)Links: Memoirs of a Roadie Birmingham Perl Mongers CPAN Testers Reports YAPC Conference Surveys