I'm Thankful for Perl

These last few years have been just astonishing and so much of it is due to Perl and the Perl Community. In 2013 I ended my 8 year graduate experience (where I learned a lot of Perl) by defending my thesis (which used Perl extensively) right into the teeth of The Sequester. The US Government decided that they weren’t going to pay for science just when I was looking for a science job. The prospects were bleak.

I turned to my local Perl Mongers group (Chicago) begging for a job. In no time at all I had one. Although it actually quickly became a Python job, I was nonetheless employed and employed well at that. Then that PM group acted as a meeting place wherein I was lured away to my second job (my first real Perl gig). This job was due in part to Mojolicious, for which I am also very thankful.

Unfortunately, not long ago I was informed that that company would be closing its doors (nothing to do with the software) and I was on the hunt for a job again. This time it would be thanks to Perl and Mojolicious and #mojo on irc.perl.org which would have me talking to the person who was to become my new boss literally minutes after I had gotten the news. Less than two weeks later I had started at ServerCentral.com writing an internal api in Perl and Mojolicious and other open source technologies. I am very thankful to them for taking me in and I’m looking forward to working with and for them.

Incidentally, if you or your company are in need of top-notch server colocation, managed infrastructure, or VMWare managed virtualization, please give ServerCentral.com a look!

From trips to YAPC::NAs and YAPC::Brasil to MojoConf in Norway, Perl has also helped me see the world. And once I arrive I am always surrounded by such amazing people. It is you that I’m most thankful for!

The Perl language and Perl Community have been responsible for and a part of so much of my success and contentment and I just want to take a moment and say: Thanks!

Anonymous Classes With Private Data

A long while back (I’ll find the reference if I can) Stevan Little, author of Moose, commented that part of what he wanted for a p5mop was the ability to have truly private data in classes. Much in the way Perl 6 has $!data attributes that are simply private data, he wanted to just be able to use Perl’s regular variables in this same way.

I took this as a bit of a challenge and several iterations later, I had a working system. I then spent months trying to decide if I wanted to put it on CPAN. I kept weighing utility vs practicality. Though it is an interesting thought exercise, I have no idea if its a good idea.

A few things happened which made me soften my view. Most importantly, the great Damian Conway released Dios which does bring lots more of the Perl6 style classes to Perl5. This lead me to stop worrying that people would actually try to use my module for real heavy lifting; if you need that use Dios. Also Stevan gave a talk at YAPC::NA which showed an exciting and I think very promising reimagining of the p5mop project.

With these two projects out there mine can just be a curiosity. I kept finding myself showing it off and wondering. Finally, today Yanick Champoux found himself pondering blessed-subref-based objects and I reminded him of my module, which I had shown him at YAPC. I mentioned that I still was on the fence about releasing it to CPAN, he replied:

So I did.

I’m happy — and a little scared — to introduce Class:Anonymous to the CPAN. It may be the strangest thing I’ve put there yet.

YAPC::NA 2015 Wrap-up and More New (PSGI!) Modules

I was lucky enough to be able to attend YAPC::NA 2015 in Salt Lake City, this year. First and foremost I have to applaud the organizers, the event was so well coordinated it looks positively effortless, which I’m sure masked the huge amount of effort that it takes to appear so.

After not being able to attend the last two YAPC::NAs, it was such a joy to be back. As my new friend VM Brasseur has been saying in #yapc lately, “these are my people.” The community feeling at all Perl meetings, and especially at YAPC::NA, is overwhelming and I loved meeting and reconnecting with so many fellow Perlers.

New CPAN Modules

I have found myself in a bit of a CPAN exuberance these last few months. While I have released several new modules, I haven’t found time to announce them individually. Here then is a joint announcement of what I’ve been doing on CPAN lately.

Come to MojoConf and tell us something cool!

Maybe you are already registered for this year’s MojoConf in New York City (June 4th-6th) or maybe you are still thinking about it. Either way, a great way to introduce yourself to the Mojolicious community is to give a talk! But what should you talk about? The cool stuff you do with Mojolicious!

Last years talks were on a wide range of topics. When I write a talk, I usually write really technical talks; I’m always trying to pack too much code into each slide. But when I’m in the audience, the ones that really knock my socks off are the ones I don’t expect.

Last year, Rich Elberger (this year’s host, incidentally) gave a talk that took me completely by surprise, he’s gaining traction using Mojolicious in an Enterprise system! How cool is that?!

So this year I’m really looking forward to seeing all the interesting ways that people are using Mojolicious! Maybe you wrote a cool app, or an interface to an API that’s popular or one that going to be. Maybe you are using Mojolicious to do some system task or solve a real-world problem.

Then again, tutorials are useful too. There are going to be lots of newcomers to Mojolicious. Maybe you want to tell us about your favorite Mojolicious feature and how to use it. Maybe you wrote a module on CPAN that you would like to show off. Maybe a construction technique that you find useful.

I’m really looking forward to this year’s MojoConf and I’m hoping to be delighted by new things, big or small! I hope to see you (and maybe even hear you) there!