What's New in WebGUI 8.0 #4 -- CHI Cache

Caching is a tricky business. Having just one kind of cache won't work, because the production environment will greatly determine the most efficient caching system. A distributed production environment would be best-served with a distributed cache. A smaller, single-server environment could use a simple shared memory cache.

Enter Jonathan Swartz's CHI module, the greatest Perl module to provide a unified caching interface. CHI is the DBI of caching: It presents an API, and delegates to CHI::Driver modules to perform the heavy lifting. It provides a layered caching system, allowing you to have a faster, more volatile cache in front of a slower, more persistent cache. It also provides a variable expiration time, preventing a "miss stampede" where all processes try to recompute an expired cache item at the same time.

By integrating CHI cache into WebGUI, we have the ability to provide any caching strategy that CHI can provide. We get Memcached, FastMmap, and DBI drivers (and more drivers can be written).

I wrote a CHI cache driver for WebGUI 7.9 that we've been using on many of our shared hosting servers. The performance increase using FastMmap through CHI over the old Storable+DBI cache module is dramatic: 2-5 times faster with CHI and FastMmap.

Using CHI in WebGUI

The fewer wrappers that WebGUI has around CPAN modules we use, the less code I have to write, and the more features will be available to our users without having to change WebGUI to use them.

To that end, you can write a section of the configuration file that gets passed directly to CHI->new. Some massaging occurs to make sure a DBI cache driver gets the right $dbh, but otherwise you can fully configure CHI directly from the WebGUI config file:

# The new default cache for WebGUI, FastMmap
{
     cache : {
         driver : 'FastMmap',
         root_dir : '/tmp/WebGUICache',
         expires_variance : 0.5
     }
 }

 # Set up a memcached cache with local memory in front
 {
     cache : {
         driver : 'Memcached::libmemcached',
         servers : [ '10.0.0.100:11211', '10.0.0.110:11211' ],
         l1_cache : {
            driver : 'Memory'
         }
     }
 }

When you want to use the cache in your code, you can get a CHI object with $session->cache. CHI's interface is sufficiently simple, with some fun tricks:

my $cache = $session->cache; # as read
my $value = $cache->get('cache_key');
if ( !$value ) {
    $value = compute_value();
    $cache->set( 'cache_key', $value );
}

# Combine get and set with intelligence
my $value = $cache->compute( 'cache_key', \&compute_value );

Future Plans

With a single unified cache that performs well and layers like CHI, we can take our current stow and scratch APIs and move them to the cache. In the case of stow, we remove a redundant API. In the case of scratch, we remove database hits.

We've also been exploring cache-only sessions, instead of updating the session every time a page is requested, updating the cache only, flushing to the database (or not). The fewer DB calls we make per page, the better performance will be.

Special thanks go out to Jonathan Swartz for such a wonderful solution.

Stay tuned for next time when I explore our new Admin Interface. Lots of pretty and screenshots!

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user-pic I blog about Perl. I work for Bank of America. I own Double Cluepon Software.