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smls

  • Commented on Perl and Me, Part 8: Endless Forms Most Beautiful and Most Wonderful
    I disagree about P5 smart-matching, I think it was rightfully deprecated (i.e. an example of "self-correcting progress" rather than "progress being blocked"). The implementation tried to overload a single operator with far too many meanings, many of which where not...
  • Commented on Marpa version of Perl6 Advent Calendar, Day 18
    "Perl6's definition: ... Marpa::R2's definitions: suit ~ [♥♦♣♠] ..." I'm pretty sure the Perl 6 grammar could *also* have used a single token (with a character class) for the suits. Afaik, separating alternations into multiple tokens connected to a proto...
  • Commented on Most common build-in functions or operators beginners should know about Perl
    Note that you need to add use Scalar::Util qw(looks_like_number); to the program before being able to call looks_like_number()...
  • Commented on A Tiny Code Quiz
    He argued that even experienced developers will often get this wrong. Many Perl programmers might not guess the correct answer when presented with this "quiz". However, I believe very few would accidentally write such code in practice while ignorant of...
  • Commented on Arrow Operator Shenanigans
    chaining may be easier to read than g(f(x)). FYI, Perl6 has sequencer operators for that: source() ==> filter() ==> sink() http://perlcabal.org/syn/S03.html...
  • Commented on Perl module ideas #5
    no joy; no such ...;...
  • Commented on Why you don't need File::Slurp…
    "For small files, it's actually significantly faster" Hm... Skimming over the code of File::Slurp, it seems to use the very same technique that you present here, in the case of small files. So rob.kinyon may be right, it might just...
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  • david.warring commented on Marpa version of Perl6 Advent Calendar, Day 18

    Agree, suit and face tokens are more verbose than needed. Here's some more concise definitions:

    token suit {}
    token face {:i | 10 }

    Nice work with the Marpa example.

  • david.warring commented on Marpa version of Perl6 Advent Calendar, Day 18

    Err, not that concise:


    token suit {<[♥♦♣♠]>}
    token face {:i <[2..9 jkqa]> | 10 }

  • Jean-Damien Durand commented on Marpa version of Perl6 Advent Calendar, Day 18

    You are right, I quoted the article as-is and this give the impression that Perl6 does not support the character class, definitely not fair since I gave the character class version afterwards with Marpa.

    I will do an UPDATE section.

  • Buddy Burden commented on Perl and Me, Part 8: Endless Forms Most Beautiful and Most Wonderful
    I suspect people railing against the evolution of Perl or any other language are thinking in terms of big business projects. The stereotypical business software project is ideally written once and then runs happily for all eternity with only minor adjustments.

    Sure, but when is this ideal ever actually realized? I've worked in some pretty conservative industries, including banking and insurance, and even there business requirements are always changing. Thus, software has to evolve. We've been doing software for long enough at this point that even the business peo…

  • Buddy Burden commented on Perl and Me, Part 8: Endless Forms Most Beautiful and Most Wonderful
    I disagree about P5 smart-matching, I think it was rightfully deprecated (i.e. an example of "self-correcting progress" rather than "progress being blocked").

    Oh, trust me: I knew that statement was going to be unpopular when I wrote it. ;->

    I will probably get around to writing a whole post about just smartmatching at some point. But in the meantime I've incorporated part of your reponse into my latest post in this series; hopefully you don't mind.

    Other than that, all I'll ask is: did you personally have a problem in your code caused…

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