blogs.perl.org statistics

A few weeks ago I posted some numbers regarding the popularity of Perl. Among the numbers I published two graphs. The data collected by Google Analytics on Meta CPAN and on Perl Maven. (It became the most visited Perl-site after search.cpan.org, perl.org, Perlmonks, and Meta CPAN.)

Today I got access to the Google Analytics panel of blogs.perl.org as well.

It seems the Google Analytics code was added on March 1, 2013. So the stats start from there. This is the monthly visitor count:

blogs.perl.org 2013 monthly stats

It does not show the steady growth as the other two sites, instead it has some strange hills. Let's look at it in a more detailed view with weekly numbers:

blogs.perl.org 2013 weekly stats

There you go. These are peaks.

If we look at the daily data for January we can see the specific dates.

blogs.perl.org 2014 January daily stats

Looking at the details of the report it turned out that surge of visits was caused by this post with a large part of the visitors coming from Reddit.

In case you'd like to compare with the other two sites, the blogs.perl.org site had 44,195 visits in December 2013.


Please note: It seems the code to collect visitors count is missing from the front-page. It will be added later today, so we'll have more complete data in a bit.

1 Comment

Yeah, we seem to bubble along at a reasonable level with an occasional massive spike like that.

The spikes all seem to be driven by posts getting onto Reddit and/or Hacker News. And mostly they seem to be Ovid's posts :-)

Those of you with long memories will remember the disaster of the first blogs.perl.org launch - when it was on horribly underpowered hardware and just didn't work. The fact that we only notice spikes like that when we look at Google Analytics makes me think that we've probably got the hardware right now!

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About Gabor Szabo

user-pic Perl author and trainer. Usually writing on other sites: Writing the Perl Maven tutorial Perl 6 articles. Started a Perl IDE. Running the Weekly Perl newsletter. My personal blog.