The Great London Perl Bake Off

You may not have noticed, but the London Perl Workshop is happening later this month (Saturday 25th November). It's a free-to-attend community event: organised by members of the community, for the community, and made possible by sponsorship from companies in our community.

Reinforcing the community theme, we're trying an experiment this year: crowd-sourcing bakes from attendees for one of the coffee breaks. If you're an experienced baker, an occasional dabbler (like myself), or even a complete neophyte looking for a reason to start, why not give it a go?

Introducing the PAUSE Operating Model

At the Toolchain Summit this year, one of the discussion sessions was to reflect on how the DBIx::Class ownership conflict was handled. We didn't only discuss DBIx::Class, but how a range of other situations were handled. One of the outcomes of that session was a request that the PAUSE admins document the rules and principles for how PAUSE is operated, and how various situations are, or will be going forward, resolved.

Since then the PAUSE admins have been discussing various scenarios and gradually working on a document which we ended up calling the PAUSE Operating Model. The name reflects that it not only describes how PAUSE works, but how the PAUSE admins run the service.

The rest of this post gives an outline of what the document covers, and where you can read it.

Ask not what CPAN can do for you

If you're still not sure what to do on CPAN Day this year, you could help me with one of my trickle projects: help us get META.yml and META.json files added to CPAN distributions that currently have neither.

Send me an email and I'll assign you a distribution. I've ordered the list of distributions based on how far up the CPAN River they are. Fixing these distributions results in more accurate river data, and will also help various tools and services.

CPAN Day is 16th August

CPAN Day marks the date of the first recorded upload to CPAN: Andreas König uploaded Symdump 1.20 (it's since been renamed Devel::Symdump).

On CPAN Day this year, you could do some small thing to help celebrate. This could be as simple as emailing the author of a module that you regularly use, and say "thank you". It may not sound like much, but it's great to be on the receiving end.

There are lots of other things you could do to help someone else's module. For a previous CPAN Day I posted a list of ideas.

Or if you've got your own distributions on CPAN, you could fix a bug, or merge an outstanding pull request *cough*. This year I plan to merge at least one PR, and do at least one release to CPAN. I'll submit a PR too.

What will you do?

The Toolchain Summit is only possible with support from our sponsors

The Perl Toolchain Summit (PTS) started yesterday (Thursday 11th May) in Lyon, France. 35 dedicated toolchain developers have assembled for four days of intensive discussions and co-working. Not only does a lot get done in these four days, but we send everyone home with longer todo lists, fired up to keep working on them.

The developers come from around the world, and we're only available to do this with the generous support of all of our sponsors. You've seen individual posts for our Platinum and Gold sponsors, but in this post we'd like to tell you about our other sponsors. If you get the chance, please thank them: all Perl developers benefit from this summit.