Ask not what CPAN can do for you

If you're still not sure what to do on CPAN Day this year, you could help me with one of my trickle projects: help us get META.yml and META.json files added to CPAN distributions that currently have neither.

Send me an email and I'll assign you a distribution. I've ordered the list of distributions based on how far up the CPAN River they are. Fixing these distributions results in more accurate river data, and will also help various tools and services.

CPAN Day is 16th August

CPAN Day marks the date of the first recorded upload to CPAN: Andreas König uploaded Symdump 1.20 (it's since been renamed Devel::Symdump).

On CPAN Day this year, you could do some small thing to help celebrate. This could be as simple as emailing the author of a module that you regularly use, and say "thank you". It may not sound like much, but it's great to be on the receiving end.

There are lots of other things you could do to help someone else's module. For a previous CPAN Day I posted a list of ideas.

Or if you've got your own distributions on CPAN, you could fix a bug, or merge an outstanding pull request *cough*. This year I plan to merge at least one PR, and do at least one release to CPAN. I'll submit a PR too.

What will you do?

The Toolchain Summit is only possible with support from our sponsors

The Perl Toolchain Summit (PTS) started yesterday (Thursday 11th May) in Lyon, France. 35 dedicated toolchain developers have assembled for four days of intensive discussions and co-working. Not only does a lot get done in these four days, but we send everyone home with longer todo lists, fired up to keep working on them.

The developers come from around the world, and we're only available to do this with the generous support of all of our sponsors. You've seen individual posts for our Platinum and Gold sponsors, but in this post we'd like to tell you about our other sponsors. If you get the chance, please thank them: all Perl developers benefit from this summit.

Specifying dependencies for your CPAN distribution

In this article I'm going to show you how to specify dependencies for your CPAN distributions: the other Perl and CPAN modules that your distribution relies on. This is the fourth article in a series. The first article gave a general introduction to distribution metadata. The second article introduced the five phases for which dependencies, or prerequisites, can be specified. The third article presented the types, or relationships, that can be specified for each dependency.

This article is brought to you by cPanel, Inc., a Gold sponsor for the Perl Toolchain Summit. cPanel are a well-known user and supporter of Perl, and we're very grateful for their support. More about cPanel at the end of this article.

Specifying the type of your CPAN dependencies

This is the third article in a series on CPAN distribution metadata. The first article was a general introduction, and the second article looked at dependencies, and in particular the different phases that you can specify dependencies for (configure, build, runtime, test, and develop). In this article, we'll cover the different types of dependencies and how you combine these with the phases (described in the previous article) to specify the dependencies (or prereqs) for your CPAN distribution.

This article is brought to you by MaxMind, a gold Sponsor for this year's Toolchain Summit, being held next month (May) in Lyon, France. The summit is only possible with the support of our sponsors.