Sponsors for the QA Hackathon

The QA Hackathon wouldn't be possible without the support of all of our generous sponsors. In this post we cover the sponsors not previously thanked here, including the individual members of the Perl community who made personal donations.

You can read about some of the things done at the hackathon in the blog posts, linked off this page on the QAH website.

STRATO is sponsoring the QA Hackathon

We're happy to announce that STRATO has decided to sponsor this year's QA Hackathon.

If you live in certain parts of Europe then you will probably have heard of STRATO, but others might not. STRATO is an ISO 27001-certified hosting provider with its headquarters in Germany. STRATO offers domains, email and homepage packages, online storage, web shops and servers through to high-end solutions.

Infinity Interactive is sponsoring the QA Hackathon

Following the recent announcement of the QA Hackathon, we're happy to announce that Infinity Interactive have signed up to sponsor this year's event. Their support means that we can invite more people to attend, and lets us focus on the work rather than the money.

You might have heard of Infinity Interactive, and you're even more likely to have heard of some of their employees. Just in case you haven't, we'd like to share some information about them.

The Perl QA Hackathon 2015

The Perl Quality Assurance Hackathon (hereafter QAH) is an annual 4-day gathering of the people who work on the core CPAN toolchain and associated systems & services. This gives them dedicated time to work on these systems together, solving hard problems and working out how to move everything forward.

Like pretty much everything in the Perl world, these are all volunteers, so our approach is to get sponsorship to cover expenses (travel, accommodation, working space, meals) for as much of the gathering as possible. If your company relies on Perl, ask yourself how much you rely on the toolchain working smoothly? Perhaps you could persuade someone to sponsor the QAH this year?

The CPAN toolchain isn't glamorous, so generally doesn't get much press, but it's an essential part of our world. So over the next few weeks we'll be posting some short articles to raise awareness and hopefully encourage some sponsorship.

More details on the CPAN Pull Request Challenge

The CPAN Pull Request challenge has had way more signups than I was expecting: 343 so far! Some are very experienced Perl programmers and CPAN contributors; some are long-term Perl programmers using this as a way to "give back"; a few are new to everything.

I wouldn't have predicted 300 pull requests in the entire year. Now we might get that in January alone! I know some people are concerned of the effect that this wave of locusts enthusiastic contributors might have, particularly if authors have to start dealing with pull requests that don't really add much value.

As a result I think it's probably helpful to give some more details on the challenge, give CPAN authors a chance to comment, and even to opt out.