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domm

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  • :m) commented on YAPC::EU 2015 from 2nd to 4th September

    interestingly, at Swiss Perl Workshop, we choose dates that are *not* during the (local) holidays. Because some people might not be able to attend because they are away on (family) holidays..

  • Salvador Fandiño commented on YAPC::EU 2015 from 2nd to 4th September

    In my case, I can seldom attend YAPC::Europe because of it happening during my kids holidays (that BTW, in Spain last until mid September!)

  • Dana Jacobsen commented on Learning Perl 6 - Find in a Large File

    I was having a similar issue, but on a larger file (32M 64-bit integers, about 120x larger than /usr/share/dict/words on my machine). This is more than I'd like to pull into an array, as it uses 13.5GB of memory.

    Using the 'for $in -> $x { ... }' style was going quite slow, but the helpful people on #perl6 got be to try .get in a loop, e.g. 'while (my $x = $in.get) { ... }' which turns out to be much faster. Not only does it use almost no memory, it's 50% faster than the latest @d = "file".IO.lines.

    BTW, this was meant to share my experience with using .get for reading a la…

  • :m) commented on Learning Perl 6 - Find in a Large File

    ah, very interesting. Thanks for mentioning.

  • Marius Gavrilescu commented on RFC Perl for education

    > Due to different requirements. Perl for production needs to support what was done 10 years ago. Perl for education should enforce current best practices, hence can be more aggressive.

    Still, breaking backwards compatibility shouldn't be a goal.

    > While both Task::Kensho and dwimperl are awesome, they do not achieve what I would like to see in Perl for education. Furthermore, they are NOT backed-up by Perl foundation..

    It is easy to create a custom Task:: with exactly the modules you would like to see in Perl for education. Why do they need to be backed up by Perl fo…

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