Item Design in MMORPGs

Still hard at work hacking on Veure (the image to the right is a freighter, by the way). I tend to get up early in the morning so I can get a couple of hours in before turning to my primary contracts. Now I'm redesigning the item system and it's a slow, frustrating process because I have such limited time. And if there is one thing that frustrates many game designers, it's how to design items in games. Fortunately, I have a fairly clear approach, thanks to a comment Aristotle made a long time ago. I'm implementing a "web friendly" version of the Entity-Component-System pattern (ECS).

Quickly Check for Database Design Flaws

Don't you just hate it? You've finished reading, again, that blog entry about database design and you're feeling that you can design something reasonable, and then you see this table:

EmployeeID| SalesPerson| SalesOffice| OfficeNumber| Customer1| Customer2| Customer3
1003 Mary Smith Chicago 312-555-1212 Ford GM
1004 John Hunt New York 212-555-1212 Dell HP Apple
1005 Martin Hap Chicago 312-555-1212 Boeing

You can easily see that Customer1, Customer2, and Customer3 are wrong, but what about the rest? Try as you might, you can't quite put all of the rules together that easily to figure out what's wrong with the above table.

There's a shortcut, though, and it makes it very easy to start understanding database design.

Creating an MMORPG in Perl

Question: do you want to hear more about my attempts to create an MMORPG in Perl, even if posts are not Perl-related? Also, are you interested in helping me develop its ideas further?

As many of you know, I'm trying to create an MMORPG running on Perl. It's codenamed veure. Though I've written about it a few times here, I've not written much because many of the entries are about game design and not strictly about Perl. As a result, I've tried to avoid spamming this blog. That being said, people constantly say "stop talking about how great Perl is and build great things with it!" So I'm trying to build something great with Perl, but as most experienced programmers know, it's not so much the programming language as the business rules which are important.

And damn, business rules in an MMORPG are hard.

Finding unused variables in your Template stash

Quite often companies who use Catalyst (with Template Toolkit) find that after a while, they're over relying on the use of the stash as a global dumping ground. To deal with that, I wrote a highly experimental module to print out unused template variables.

Procedural Quest Generation in Perl

Yes, it's another post about Veure (whose actual name we might finally have chosen, but that's another story), the MMORPG that I've been writing.

There are 117 stars in a 20 light year radius around Sol. There are 544 space stations and currently there are 3,080 rooms in those stations (and that number is growing). That means there's a lot of area, but how do I fill that area? There's a lot of work still left to be done, but I took a quick stab at implementing a procedural mission generator as described in this paper. Surprisingly, the core of the code only took about an hour to write.

About Ovid

user-pic Freelance Perl/Testing/Agile consultant and trainer. See http://www.allaroundtheworld.fr/ for our services. If you have a problem with Perl, we will solve it for you. And don't forget to buy my book! http://www.amazon.com/Beginning-Perl-Curtis-Poe/dp/1118013840/